A police officer was beaten by an angry mob for causing an accident after he grabbed the steering wheel from the kombi driver. An unnamed passenger told The Chronicle that a police officer had ordered a kombi driver to drive to Drill Hall Police Station but changed his mind and seemed to ask for a bribe. The driver did not to cooperate, resulting in the cop grabbing the steering wheel.

The Bulawayo United Public Transporters Association (Bupta) kombi uprooted a pillar and crashed into a glass display at a hardware shop at the corner of Third Avenue and Lobengula Street in Bulawayo around 10AM. Witnesses said the commuter omnibus which had been impounded by police at a check point near McKeurtan Primary School “dangerously zigzagged across the road” as the driver and the unnamed cop wrestled for the steering wheel. The driver is said to have sustained minor injuries. Bulawayo provincial police spokesperson Inspector Precious Simango yesterday said she was yet to receive a report of the issue.

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Kombi is the informal name of minibuses in Zimbabwe. This is usually given to the 18 seater type which are privately owned but used for public transport in the country. They are the most popular form of public transport in Zimbabwe a result of the decline of formal city transport once dominated by government run ZUPCO transport company. A Kombi used for public usually plys both the local residential suburb to city routes (e.g. Mbare to Harare city centre) and the city to city routes (e.g. Bulawayo to Harare). When used as public transport the Kombi is usually manned by two people, a driver and a conductor. While the former duty is primarily driving, the latter is in charge of collecting the kombi fare from the passengers, open and close the door when passengers get to their destination or when picking up someone as well as calling out the destination of the vehicle while it's moving through an area so that anyone travelling that route can flag it down. At the terminuses the job of loading the kombi is done by a Hwindi who calls to potential passengers while the Kombi is stationary. The hwindi is paid on the spot for his services once the kombi is full. The driver and conductor however are employees of the Kombi owner and are usually paid as regular employees at day's end, week's end or even month. Read More

Bulawayo is Zimbabwe's second largest city. Its location was selected by the last Matebele king, King lobengula. Bulawayo used to be one of the country's most attractive cities and a major transport hub for Southern Africa until Zimbabwe entered a period of economic depression in the early 00s. The name Bulawayo is loosely translated 'the place of slaughter' or 'the place of killing', which is derived from the Ndebele word 'bulala' meaning 'kill'. Read More