Didymus Mutasa

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Didymus Mutasa is a politician affiliated to the Zimbabwe National Union Patriotic Front (ZANU PF) who become the first speaker of Parliament at independence in 1980 and is the current Presidential Affairs Minister.

Background

He was born Didymus Noel Edwin Mutasa on July 7, 1935 in Rusape and is the 6th born.His first born Wing Commander Mutasa died in 2009.

Education

he attended Goromonzi Secondary School between 1950 and 1956. He did his tertiary education nthe Unitd Kingdom graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Social Sciences from the Birmingham University.[1]

Political Career

Mutasa joind politics as a member of the African National Congress in 1957 before joining ZANU PF in 1963.He was imprisoned for two years between 1970-72.He became popular in 1980 when he became the first black Speaker of Parliament in 1980, a post which he held for ten years until 1990. He had served as Makoni North Member f Parliament between 2000 and 2004. Mutasa was then appointed Minister of Special Affairs in the President’s Office in charge of the Anti-Corruption and Anti-Monopolies.</ref>Mugabe rewards loyalists in new Cabinet</ref> He had served in the President's Office more than twice, first as Minister of State for National Security, Lands, Land Reform and Resettlement in the President's Office between 2005 and 2008 and Minister of State for Presidential Affairs from 2008. At the inception of the Government of National Unity in 2009, Mutasa became Minister of State for Presidential Affairs. He is also the ZANU PF Secretary for Administration.

Operation Murambatsvina

Mutasa allegedly launched the infamous Operation Murambatsvina (clean up) in May 2005 were all illegal settlements being destroyed. The operation which received widespread criticism, rendrered more than 700 000 families homeless.[2]