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'''Mhangura''' is a Town located in [[Mashonaland West Province]] in [[Zimbabwe]].  
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'''Mhangura''' (formerly Mangula) is a Town in [[Mashonaland West Province]], 185 km North West of [[Harare]] and 65 km North of [[Chinhoyi]]. It is a copper mining town. The name was probably derived from the Shona word mhangura meaning "red metal" in reference to copper.
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==Location==
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Coordinates: 16°54′S 30°09′E<br/>
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According to the 1982 census, Mhangura had a population of 11,175.<br/>
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In 2009, the population was about 6,503.<br/> 
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==History==
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In 1930, a copper deposit was discovered by [[Anglo American]].<br/>
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In 1955, the deposit began to be worked.<br/>
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Miriam Mine (formerly Norah Mine) is owned by MTD (Mangula) Zimbabwe Mining Development Corp, with a major government interest. This deposit had 12.3 million tons of reserves in 1984. It was closed. The deposit was composed of a sediment-hosted ore zone following an epidiorite sill. There is evidence of evaporites present in the area.<br/.
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All mining was closed in the late 1990s, due to falling prices on the world copper market.
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==Other information==
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Main crops in the area are [[maize]], [[tobacco]], [[cotton]] and [[coffee]].<br/>
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[[Natsai Mushangwe]], a cricketer, comes from Mhangura.
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==Further Reading==
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<ref name="Encyclopedia Zimbabwe"> [Katherine Sayce (Ed), Tabex, Encyclopedia Zimbabwe], Tabex, Encyclopedia Zimbabwe'', (Quest Publishing, Harare, 1987), Retrieved: 25 July 2019'' </ref>
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<ref name="Wikipedia"> [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mhangura  Wikipedia], ''Wikipedia, Retrieved: 22 October 2019''</ref>
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<ref name="Mhangura: The melting pot of poverty, STIs"> [https://www.thestandard.co.zw/2018/10/07/mhangura-melting-pot-poverty-stis/  Mhangura: The melting pot of poverty, STIs], ''The Standard, Published: 7 October 2018, Retrieved: 22 October 2019''</ref>
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<ref name="Miriam Mine (Norah Mine)"> [https://www.mindat.org/loc-16404.html  Miriam Mine (Norah Mine)], ''Mindat.org, Retrieved: 22 October 2019''</ref>
  
==Population==
 
It is home to about 6,503 people and the population comprises of both sexes of different nationalities although the majority are local Zimbabweans.
 
  
  
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[[Category:Towns and Cities]][[Category:Places]]
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[[Category:Towns and Cities]]
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[[Category:Places]]

Latest revision as of 17:28, 22 October 2019

Mhangura
Population
 (2009)
6,503

Mhangura (formerly Mangula) is a Town in Mashonaland West Province, 185 km North West of Harare and 65 km North of Chinhoyi. It is a copper mining town. The name was probably derived from the Shona word mhangura meaning "red metal" in reference to copper.

Location

Coordinates: 16°54′S 30°09′E
According to the 1982 census, Mhangura had a population of 11,175.
In 2009, the population was about 6,503.

History

In 1930, a copper deposit was discovered by Anglo American.
In 1955, the deposit began to be worked.
Miriam Mine (formerly Norah Mine) is owned by MTD (Mangula) Zimbabwe Mining Development Corp, with a major government interest. This deposit had 12.3 million tons of reserves in 1984. It was closed. The deposit was composed of a sediment-hosted ore zone following an epidiorite sill. There is evidence of evaporites present in the area.<br/. All mining was closed in the late 1990s, due to falling prices on the world copper market.

Other information

Main crops in the area are maize, tobacco, cotton and coffee.
Natsai Mushangwe, a cricketer, comes from Mhangura.

Further Reading

[1]

[2]

[3]

[4]


Articles You Might Like






References

  1. [Katherine Sayce (Ed), Tabex, Encyclopedia Zimbabwe], Tabex, Encyclopedia Zimbabwe, (Quest Publishing, Harare, 1987), Retrieved: 25 July 2019
  2. Wikipedia, Wikipedia, Retrieved: 22 October 2019
  3. Mhangura: The melting pot of poverty, STIs, The Standard, Published: 7 October 2018, Retrieved: 22 October 2019
  4. Miriam Mine (Norah Mine), Mindat.org, Retrieved: 22 October 2019