Nyangambe Community Wildlife Project

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Nyangambe Wildlife Conservation Project is a buffer zone for Save Valley Conservancy. It is one of the thriving community wildlife conservancies run by indigenous people in Chiredzi.

Background

The project was started by 181 families in 2006 after realising that the community was getting problems from animals which were straying from Save Valley Conservancy. More than 5 000 hectares of grazing area was put aside and fenced in order to tap problem animals from Save Valley Conservancy to their benefit.

The community has been failing to get a hunting permit from the responsible authority which is Parks and Wildlife. Since 2006 they have never hunted independently but used to do it in collaboration with other partners who are within Save Valley Conservancy, but that gives them little money. The chairperson of the project Mr. Amos Mangule said they visited Parks’ offices several times despite having an ownership clearance from Chiredzi Rural District Council but nothing fruitful came out.[1]

Poaching

Kudakwashe Mnangagwa, one of President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s sons is allegedly involved in the poaching of wildlife in Nyangambe in Save Valley Conservancy, a Chiredzi magistrate has been told. The allegations were made by Farai Chauke, a Harare lawyer who comes from Nyangambe and is also the legal representative of the Nyangambe Community Wildlife Project. Chauke who is facing fraud charges for allegedly forging title deeds to the project told the court in his defense that he was being tormented for resisting poaching activities involving the President’s son.[2]



References

  1. Morris Bishi, [1], Commercial Farmers Union of Zimbabwe, Published: 15 September, 2014, Accessed: Nov 2019
  2. Morris Bishi, [2], Nehanda Radio, Published: 16 May, 2020, Accessed: 12 June, 2020