HomeWildlife

Five Elephants Found Dead In Sinamatela, Hwange - ZIMPARKS

2 months agoWed, 06 Dec 2023 12:36:43 GMT
Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
Five Elephants Found Dead In Sinamatela, Hwange - ZIMPARKS

Five elephants were found dead in Sinamatela, Hwange, Zimbabwe, and authorities attribute their deaths to dehydration caused by extreme temperatures and a lack of rain. The elephants were part of the population in Hwange National Park, which is home to an estimated 44,000 elephants. In a statement seen by Pindula News, Zimbabwe National Parks Authority spokesperson, Tinashe Farawo said preliminary investigations have shown that they succumbed to dehydration. He said:

5 elephants were found dead in Sinamatela, Hwange. Preliminary investigations have shown that they succumbed to dehydration.

In recent years, elephants have been migrating to neighbouring Botswana in search of water. However, this year, the migration started earlier due to the water crisis. Young and elderly elephants, as well as those who were unable to travel long distances, have been particularly vulnerable to dehydration and hunger. Farawo told News24:

As the dry period persists, young, ailing, and elderly elephants are particularly vulnerable since they are unable to travel great distances in search of water and food; some have been stranded near water holes, foraging all plants within their range.

Zimparks is drilling boreholes powered by solar energy in wildlife sanctuaries to provide water. However, when surface water dries up, animals are forced to travel long distances to find food and water. In 2019, about 200 elephants died due to the drought.

Usanetseke neNetOne airtime.

Baya *405# utenge neEcoCash

To protect the country’s wildlife, including elephants and lions, it may be necessary to relocate them to areas with better access to water and food. The lack of rain and rising temperatures, exacerbated by the El Nino weather pattern, continue to pose a threat to wildlife in Southern Africa.

Hwange National Park is part of the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA), covering Botswana, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Angola. This vast conservation area provides a habitat for a diverse range of wildlife, and animals migrate between these countries based on climate and seasonal factors.

More Pindula News

Tags

18 Comments

Leave a Comment


Generate a Whatsapp Message

Buy Phones on Credit.

More Deals
Feedback