Misheck Velaphi Ncube was a Zimbabwean politician who died on 29 April 2019. At the time of his death Ncube was a Zanu-PF National Consultative member. Following his death, Ncube was declared a national hero.

Velaphi Misheck Ncube
DiedUnited Bulawayo Hospitals
Spouse(s)Margaret Velaphi Ncube

Contents

Background

He was married to Margaret Velaphi Ncube.[1]

Liberation Struggle Contribution

Ncube was involved in the liberation struggle and was incarcerated with Emmerson Mnangagwa at Khami Prison. He fought among the first group of fighters who launched the liberation struggle on the ZIPRA side. Ncube was part of the Battle of Hwange which took place in the 1960s. He was one of the first to undertake military training in Egypt in 1962.

In 1966, he and his colleagues took advantage of the political instability in the Congo where they raided the Congolese rebels, poisoned them before looting their weapons. His mission led to the first smuggling of weapons into Southern Rhodesia. [2]

Career

After Independence, he served in Zanu-PF's National Consultative Assembly and the Central Committee. At the time of his death, Ncube had started documenting his history with the help of renowned historian Pathisa Nyathi.[2]

Arrest

Ncube was the Zapu administrator soon after independence and was among top leaders that were arrested after the government allegedly discovered arms caches at a farm owned by the party. The arrests, which also saw the detention of late Zipra commander Lookout Masuku and Dumiso Dabengwa being charged with treason marked the beginning of the Gukurahundi massacres.[3]

Death

Ncube died from a diabetes related ailment. He died at the United Bulawayo Hospitals where he had been admitted.[1]
  1. 1.0 1.1 Limukani Ncube, Liberation stalwart Velaphi Ncube declared National hero, Sunday News, published: May 5, 2019, retrieved: may 8, 2019
  2. 2.0 2.1 Velaphi declared national hero, Sunday Mail, published: May 5, 2019, retrieved: May 9, 2019
  3. Ncube declared national hero, Standard, published: May 5, 2019, retrieved: May 9, 2019